Ravens
Chargers players are claiming they knew the Ravens offensive plays (AP Photo/Gail Burton)

Well, well, well. The Lamar Jackson puke train doesn’t stop. It’s like the media is trying to rip my heart out one story at a time. Just minutes after writing a hate piece about Lamar Jackson, more news comes out about how much of a joke the Ravens are turning into. As if the playoff loss to the Chargers wasn’t embarrassing enough, defensive players on Los Angeles claimed they knew most of Baltimore’s offensive plays.

This story comes our way via Sports Illustrated:

“Damion Square, an end who started at nose tackle, said part of the Chargers’ success was homing in on tendencies they had learned since the teams’ last meeting. He said Los Angeles knew what was coming “60 to 70 percent of the time.” He gave an example of a play that ended the Ravens’ opening drive: The team was facing a third-and-five near midfield, and Square said they knew Jackson likes to escape to his left. After Jackson had scanned the field trying to find somewhere to throw, he did indeed drift left, and Square began to move with him. Defensive end Isaac Rochell was in Jackson’s face as he dropped the ball, but Jackson then recovered it himself and again tried to scamper left. Square was closing in on him as Jackson threw an incomplete pass, forcing a punt.”

“You see tendencies,” Square said. “Guys react the same way all the time to pressure. We saw that on tape. We knew where he wanted to escape, and we showed up in those gaps.”

This is the least shocking news of all time. I saw it within the first minutes of the game. The minute I saw the adjustments from the Chargers, I knew the Ravens were screwed. There isn’t much more to say than what I’ve already said. If the Chargers figured out this gimmick so quickly, what do you think the rest of the league is going to do when they see this film? The future? Lamar Jackson is already the past. It’s over. Admit the mistake.

“Each defensive player seemed to have an example of making a play through anticipation. Nickel corner Desmond King said he recognized a formation with a receiver off the ball and a tight end lined up tight on the backside that helped him know where the ball was going and be in the right position for an incompletion. Jenkins said he got a tip from Phillips, who had noticed while studying the sideline tablet between series that Jenkins had incorrectly played one of the Ravens’ route concepts, a sluggo seam. Jackson missed the open throw that time, but when the Ravens tried it again, Jenkins had made the correct adjustment to prevent giving up a big play.”

“[Phillips] came to the sideline and said, ‘Look at your alignment. They are really trying to manipulate you because of how you are jumping the quick game,’” Jenkins recounted. “He was right. When they came back to it again, I was there and I took his read away, and [Jackson] had to look off again. That was a big thing right there. If we can get him off his first read, it is hard, because QBs want their first read most of the time.”

Total clown show. John Harbaugh and the Ravens organization sold their soul to the depths of hell and it’s going to back fire. This isn’t reinventing the wheel. You draft a quarterback that can actually throw a damn ball. Not a running quarterback that has one way to win.